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Blood in the forest

Identification of ecologically fragile areas prioritized for forest conservation and restoration in Mambasa and Mongbwalu sectors, Ituri Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo

The landscape of the Mambasa and Mongbwalu sectors are facing an undergoing a gradual decline in dense and secondary forests, triggered by (legal, illegal and unregulated) resource exploitation and their unsustainable use, some detrimental forms of agriculture, rapid urban growth in absence of long-term strategic planning, all linked by instability arising from land conflicts that chronically plague the region.

The restoration of degraded ecosystems is an essential activity to achieve environmental and ecological justice. Environmental and ecological justice focus on the intersections between the systemic exploitation of humans and the natural world; this includes inequities in the access and use of natural resources and in the distribution of environmental harms (by race, class, gender, among many). Furthermore, land rights for women in East Africa go beyond property rights and touch on often sensitive issues around different tenure systems (statutory, customary and religious), landbased wealth, power and social relations that give or take away their right to access and control resources.

This study focuses on the process of identifying ecologically fragile areas in which to implement forest conservation and restoration projects from a local, not purely biological and participatory perspective.

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Towards a food sovereignty strategy to strengthen food security. A model for Albertine Region

The term food sovereignty, coined with the aim to politicize the food and agricultural debates from below, refers to the right of nations and peoples to control their own food systems, including their won markets, production modes, food cultures and environments. This approach creates wider socio- cultural and ecological synergies by promoting principles of diversity, recycling, integration and re-embedding food within social processes and eco-systemic dynamics. The food sovereignty movement proposes a localist approach to meeting food security and is spawning multiple local projects, whereby people are empowered to define their own culturally and environmentally appropriate food systems. Food sovereignty has emerged as an alternative approach for achieving food security at the local level. 

ED has designed an interpretive model to understand what actions are necessary to implement projects within a food sovereignty strategy. This scheme is the result of a holistic approach that identifies the drivers and constraints to implement this strategy.

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New Oil, Same Business? At a Crossroads to Avert Catastrophe in Uganda

FIDH and FHRI undertook this Community-based human rights impact assessment (“Assessment” or “Report”) of the Lake Albert to address the impacts of extractive industries. The Report, which is the result of a long process and implements a community-based Human Rights Impact Assessment methodology, documents a number of human rights violations and abuses resulting from the activities of the State of Uganda and the companies developing the oil projects in the Tilenga and Kingfisher areas. In particular, the Report focuses on the right to land, housing, and an adequate standard of living, the right to health and clean water, and the right to a healthy environment. The violations of these rights are inextricably related to violations of the right to information, the right to participation, and the right of access to justice. The Report also emphasizes the great risks of further harm to human and environmental rights in decades to come if Total, CNOOC, and the Ugandan Government fail to enact a series of preventive and remedial measures, as well as larger policy changes, before moving on with the project.

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OIL-INDUCED LAND COMPENSATION DISPOSSESSION AND WOMEN’S EXPERIENCES IN ALBERTINE GRABEN, UGANDA

In the last thirteen years since the discovery of oil and gas resources in Uganda, numerous developments have taken place to pave way for the development of oil and gas sector which necessitated land acquisition. In response, interventions such as cash compensation, partial land acquisition and resettlement were undertaken. The lacuna for this study is that, there is limited research that focuses on the experiences of women in oilinduced land dispossession, compensation and resettlement in
relation to their reliance on the land for livelihood. This paper, therefore, aims at evaluating these experiences on land compensation dispossession for oil and gas development activities and the impact on women’s livelihoods in Albertine region. A phenomenological study research design was adopted through multimethod such as indepth interviews, focus group discussions, covert observation and documentary evidence.
Purposive sampling was used to select wo men in categories and snowball sampling to trace displaced women who were not resettled. Findings indicate that cash
compensation and resettlement process had loopholes that failed to deal with social, cultural and economic aspects of the affected communities. In conclusion, oil induced compensation process has had devastating experiences on women and many have become more vulnerable. We argue that the negative lived experiences by women as a result of compensation process were attributed to their subordinate status in the rural communities in respect to property ownership and household decision making. The study recommends that future land compensation, resettlement and implementation strategies be genderinclusive in order to mitigate negative
impacts on women livelihoods.

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SERIOUS BREACHES OF THE DUTY OF VIGILANCE LAW. THE CASE OF TOTAL IN UGANDA

Total’s operations in Uganda involve risks of serious human rights and environmental violations, detailed in the present report. In spite of these risks, Total’s 2018 vigilance plan mentions no specific vigilance measures for the Tilenga and EACOP projects. The vigilance plan thus fails to comply with the duty of vigilance law, as it does not map risks. The plan is clearly inadequate, as potential risks caused by the group’s operations are only described in a perfunctory manner. Only very general risks are mentioned, and the plan does not include a detailed report or rank risks based on the group’s actual operations (e.g. by sector, by geographical area, by activity, by company/ supplier/subcontractor, etc.)

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DIGGING FOR POWER: WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND JUSTICE AMIDST THE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENTS IN THE ALBERTINE AND KARAMOJA, UGANDA

The research was carried out in the framework of a project aimed at improving access to justice for communities affected by extractive industries, implemented by Avocats Sans Frontières (ASF) and its partner organisation in Uganda Advocate for Natural Resources and Development (ANARDE). The research covers two of our implementation areas: the Karamoja sub-region in the Eastern Region and the Bunyoro Kingdom in the Western Region – parts of which are also geographically referred to as the Albertine Graben. While culturally distinct, both regions show similarities in the patriarchal norms that their societies hinge on, an element which was relevant to our study. Extractive industries have been expanding in both regions in the past decades, albeit exploiting different resources. The sites were selected for they offer to observe EI-related change in several declinations – oil exploitation, Artisanal and Small-scale Mining (ASM) and semi-industrial mining – and at different stages of development – exploration and infrastructure-building on the one hand, advanced exploitation on the other.

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DIGGING DEEP. THE IMPACT OF UGANDA’S LAND RUSH ON WOMEN’S RIGHTS

Land – its access, control and ownership – lies at the heart of power relationships within Uganda.
The struggle for land is deeply intertwined with the struggle for women’s rights. Women’s access to and control over resources and economic decision making is fundamental to the achievement of their rights. Despite some progress, inequality between women and men in ownership and control of land remains stark. Women’s rights organisations (WROs) in Uganda have identified changing patterns of land use as a major problem affecting women across the country. While land has long been a locus of conflict and dissent, the most recent wave of dispute is caused by what has been termed the land rush or land grabs – investors purchasing or leasing land for mining or the production of cash crops. The economic ideology, espoused by governments throughout Africa and beyond, is that increased foreign direct investment and the commodification of agriculture will create a more developed and prosperous economy with jobs and wealth. The reality for many rural women has been very different.

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Land Grabbing and Oil Industry, Implications for Women’s Land Rights and Oil Industry in Uganda

The discovery of oil in any country is met with joy and jubilation for its prospective contribution to development. This is no different for Uganda. The need for land to pave way for oil exploitation and exploration as well as speculative investment has generated a challenge of land acquisition which in this paper I have considered to be land grabbing. The phenomenon of land grabbing has been widely researched in the agricultural sector because of the scale and size of land taken over in the process of land acquisition and much less in the oil and extractive industry. This paper explores the drivers of oil related land grabbing, the impact of land grabbing on women’s land rights and the implications of land grabbing related conflicts on the oil industry in Uganda. The paper concludes that land grabbing is real, the drivers are both institutional- state led, has impacted women’s land rights and livelihoods negatively, and that the impact on the oil industry are largely destructive for the success of the oil industry.

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